LANDON METZ

Art

Space is important to Landon Metz. In his art, pools of colour float across canvas leaving vast areas of unprimed fabric. In his studio the same sense of space – and the importance of the negative – is evident in the blanks between sparsely scattered furniture and plants.
While his expansive canvases seem to be spontaneous clots of colour, in truth Metz pours diluted dye directly onto raw canvas and then slowly and meticulously manipulates it with a brush or squeegee. Similarly, the studio is studied, the furniture chosen with a discriminating eye – a Chandigarh chair, a Wassily Chair, and an Ekstrem Armchair by Terje Ekstrøm.
The entirely white studio in New York City’s Chinatown is flooded with light from steel-framed windows and bare neon tubes, a laboratory-like location for the exploration of “moments of oneness”, emptiness and the relation of form and non-form, the negative space allowing elements to work together.

Landon Metz has created an exclusive series of artworks for Ark Journal VOLUME VIII, and also talks to fellow painter David Risley.

PHOTOGRAPHY CLÉMENT PASCAL
TAILORED INTERIOR

TAILORED INTERIOR

In the small Belgian village of Itegem, interior architect Peter Ivens discovered a unique and exotic villa with well-preserved 1920’s details reminiscent of a classical British colonial style – a central stairway, symmetrical plan, alcove windows, hipped roof and upper dormer windows.

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CASE STUDY — PERIOD PIECES

CASE STUDY
— PERIOD PIECES

In the unique surroundings of the house created by Danish sculptor Rikard Axel Poulsen (1887-1972) furniture, lighting and homewares by contemporary designers exhibit their serene poise, the avant-garde flanked by the archaic to create layers of history.

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LANDON METZ

Art

Space is important to Landon Metz. In his art, pools of colour float across canvas leaving vast areas of unprimed fabric. In his studio the same sense of space – and the importance of the negative – is evident in the blanks between sparsely scattered furniture and plants.
While his expansive canvases seem to be spontaneous clots of colour, in truth Metz pours diluted dye directly onto raw canvas and then slowly and meticulously manipulates it with a brush or squeegee. Similarly, the studio is studied, the furniture chosen with a discriminating eye – a Chandigarh chair, a Wassily Chair, and an Ekstrem Armchair by Terje Ekstrøm.
The entirely white studio in New York City’s Chinatown is flooded with light from steel-framed windows and bare neon tubes, a laboratory-like location for the exploration of “moments of oneness”, emptiness and the relation of form and non-form, the negative space allowing elements to work together.

Landon Metz has created an exclusive series of artworks for Ark Journal VOLUME VIII, and also talks to fellow painter David Risley.

PHOTOGRAPHY CLÉMENT PASCAL
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