THE SHAPE OF LIGHT
— ARK X GUBI

ADVERTORIAL

In collaboration with Gubi, and to celebrate the brand’s new lighting collections, Ark Journal’s creative team produced a photo essay inspired by the Californian mid-century modern architectural style. It’s an homage to a period that embraced both art and craft, a time of eclecticism and optimism that was defined by the transition from modernism, an era that was both forward-thinking and outward-looking. It was an epoch suffused with a desire to experiment and with a curiosity about other people’s cultures, and particularly folk art. A deep concern for comfort and nourishing of the spirit resulted in natural materials, ceramic and organic sculptures combined with the cosiness of low-level furniture.

CASE STUDY— PERIOD PIECES DESIGN

CASE STUDY
— PERIOD PIECES DESIGN

In the unique surroundings of the house created by Danish sculptor Rikard Axel Poulsen (1887-1972) furniture, lighting and homewares by contemporary designers exhibit their serene poise, the avant-garde flanked by the archaic to create layers of history.

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CULTIVATING PATINA

CULTIVATING PATINA

How to create a newly built house that feels comfortably familiar and as burnished as the well-loved objects that move with the owners? Designer Elisabeth Snejbjerg and former architect now photographer Mikael Bonde after 25 years in Copenhagen moved to the country near Aarhus to a house they designed and built among trees.

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BACKYARD REFUGE

BACKYARD REFUGE

Small but perfectly matched, two residences in a courtyard are reduced to the essentials using quality materials and maximum light to create welcoming tranquillity.

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THE SHAPE OF LIGHT
— ARK X GUBI

ADVERTORIAL

In collaboration with Gubi, and to celebrate the brand’s new lighting collections, Ark Journal’s creative team produced a photo essay inspired by the Californian mid-century modern architectural style. It’s an homage to a period that embraced both art and craft, a time of eclecticism and optimism that was defined by the transition from modernism, an era that was both forward-thinking and outward-looking. It was an epoch suffused with a desire to experiment and with a curiosity about other people’s cultures, and particularly folk art. A deep concern for comfort and nourishing of the spirit resulted in natural materials, ceramic and organic sculptures combined with the cosiness of low-level furniture.

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